Laser Engraved Glass Bottles
Processed Material Examples

Laser Engraved Glass Bottles

Have an empty glass bottle or two lying around somewhere? Maybe you just polished off the last round of drinks haven’t thrown out the bottle just yet. Before you do, why not try something creative with it?

By engraving used glass bottles with the FABOOL Laser CO2, you can create decorative pieces, reception/wedding favors, graduation/birthday gifts, commemorative art and more. Glass bottles come in all different shapes, sizes, and colors so there’s a good chance you can make something for just about anyone.

Positioning

Positioning bottles can be pretty simple and straightforward, especially if they are perfectly cylindrical and don’t taper toward the mouth. However, because they are still curved surfaces, you’ll want to take extra care with the size of the design and with the boundary check before processing.

Positioning-1 Positioning-2

For a quick recap on some positioning tricks and methods for similar items, take a look at these previous blog posts:
Engraving Glass with the CO2 Laser

A good way to prepare the data is by getting a rough measurement of the bottle area you want the design to cover and create a rectangle in the software that matches the dimensions.

Positioning-bottle-1 Positioning-bottle-2

Then position the bottle onto the working bed (you’ll have to remove the honeycomb to allow for the correct laser head height adjustment) and adjust the position of the rectangle while using the boundary check to confirm the correct area. Here we used a folded strip of clear tape to hold the bottle in place.

clear tape to hold the bottle

The method allows to you to simply create your design or text and insert it into the rectangle to ensure that the data is not too large.

data

Laser Settings

Generally with glass, a good starting point to test is with the laser speed around 6000-4500 and power around 20-25%. Any higher for the speed and it may not produce a clear consistent engraving, and any lower my cause extra glass shards to flake off and mess up the design. Similar problems can arise from the wrong power setting as well. For the green glass, as you can see below, we also got good results from setting the speed to max (8000). Normally, this would be just a bit too fast to get a clear and uniform etching on regular glass. We also got better results using a slightly higher speed with frosted glass as well.

green glass-1 green glass-2

Speed: 8000
Power: 20
Passes: 1
Hatching: 0.05
Time: 10 mins

frosted glass1-1 frosted glass1-2
frosted glass1-3 frosted glass1-4

Speed: 6000
Power: 20
Passes: 1
Hatching: 0.05
Time: 12 mins

regular glass-1 regular glass-2

Speed: 4000
Power: 20
Passes: 1
Hatching: 0.05
Time: 14 mins

frosted glass2-1 frosted glass2-2

Speed: 6000
Power: 20
Passes: 1
Hatching: 0.05
Time: 16 mins

Final Product

Once you’ve finished, you can set these up in a kitchen or shelf as decoration. You could also gift use one as a party or wedding favor. There are plenty of options, but regardless of which you like, it’s a way to turn a simple empty bottle into a new craft.

simple bottle